A History Of Film Exhibition And Reception In Colonial Hong Kong: 1897 To 1925
Displaying 1 - 20 of 77
1
Newspaper Source: South China Morning Post
Publication Date: 1917-10-05 - 1917-10-10
Summary:

There will be a fete at the Public Gardens, and new Official War Films will be shown for the first time in Hongkong.

2
Newspaper Source: South China Morning Post
Publication Date: 1919-10-11 - 1919-10-11
Summary:

There will be a fete at the Public Gardens, and new Official War Films will be shown for the first time in Hongkong. And also Grand Chinese Theatrical Entertainment at the Taiping Theatre.

3
Newspaper Source: South China Morning Post
Publication Date: 1913-12-18
Summary:

Chicago, Nov. 14 – Athletics and entertainment are encouraged by the governor of the prison and the State Board of Control, to arouse the interest and spirit of the men under detention. Moving pictures are shown several evenings a week at the Anamosa Prison, and the governor says that these and…

4
Newspaper Source: South China Morning Post
Publication Date: 1914-10-17
Summary:

At the Tai Ping Theatre, West Point, the Confucius Society held its annual celebration.

5
Newspaper Source: South China Morning Post
Publication Date: 1915-06-22
Summary:

A Chinese who stole a pair of shoes from the feet of another Chinese whilst the latter was asleep in the Tai Ping Theatre on Sunday.

6
Headline: The Opium Case
Newspaper Source: South China Morning Post
Publication Date: 1915-12-10
Summary:

Mr. Hazeland heard further evidence in the case in which Edmund Walter Hickrath, 31, merchant, of England, Ethel Rearden, 37, widow, of New York, and Madam Emich Delcaire, 32, of France. The witness did not know that the defendant was posing as a cinematograph proprietor.

7
Headline: The Opium Case
Newspaper Source: South China Morning Post
Publication Date: 1915-12-16
Summary:

Mr. Hazeland heard further evidence in the case in which Edmund Walter Hickrath, 31, merchant, of England, Ethel Rearden, 37, widow, of New York, and Madam Emich Delcaire, 32, of France. A witness said Cohen told her the boxes contained cinema films.

8
Newspaper Source: South China Morning Post
Publication Date: 1915-12-17
Summary:

The opium case continued. Mr. J. H. Taggart, manager of the Hongkong Hotel, said he had known a man named Sydney Cohen for about ten years. To witness's knowledge he was connected with the cinematograph business as he had seen films which he carried.

9
Newspaper Source: South China Morning Post
Publication Date: 1916-06-07
Summary:

Police Sgt. McDonald was in the role of defendant yesterday, being charged with assult by the proprietor of the Chung Fa Mo Toy cinema. Appearing to prosecute for the Chinese proprietor, Mr. W. E. L. Shenton said that at the evening exhibition of pictures on May 27 the defendant was watching the…

10
Newspaper Source: South China Morning Post
Publication Date: 1918-07-31
Summary:

The Manager of Kau Yue [sic] Fong Theatre was summoned for failing to renew his license for dramatic performances.

11
Newspaper Source: South China Morning Post
Publication Date: 1918-08-03
Summary:

The managers of the Victoria, Hongkong and Empire Theatres were charged at the Police Court yesterday. The summons against the Victoria Theatre was for failing to keep two buckets of water and a wetted blanket immediately outside the box containing the cinematograph machine. There was a similar…

12
Newspaper Source: South China Morning Post
Publication Date: 1918-08-24
Summary:

A Chinese ex-constable, employed at the Po Hing Theatre, was charged with assaulting another Chinese. Both men were bound over in a sum of $50.

13
Newspaper Source: South China Morning Post
Publication Date: 1918-08-26
Summary:

The manager of the Po Hing Theatre was summoned for not having the proper amount of fire appliances as required and for not exhibiting the license specifying the fire appliances required. The defendant was fined a total of $35.

14
Newspaper Source: South China Morning Post
Publication Date: 1918-08-31
Summary:

Summonses against the Victoria Theatre, the Tai Ping Theatre, the Hongkong Theatre and Empire Theatre were heard yesterday at the Police Court. The case of the Victoria Theatre, which was summoned on three counts, was heard first, the charges being for neglecting to close a passage or gangway…

15
Newspaper Source: South China Morning Post
Publication Date: 1918-09-11
Summary:

The manager of the Kwau Yue [sic] Fong theatre was summoned for failing to have the required number of firewater buckets during the performance as specified in the licence.

16
Newspaper Source: South China Morning Post
Publication Date: 1918-09-21
Summary:

Two Chinese were charged with assaulting a ticket collection in the Ko Shing Theatre. Bail was fixed at $100 each and the case was remanded till Wednesday.

17
Newspaper Source: South China Morning Post
Publication Date: 1918-10-04
Summary:

A charge of assaulting the ticket collector of a Chinese cinema was withdrawn against a Chinese boy. It was another boy who assaulted the complainant.

18
Newspaper Source: South China Morning Post
Publication Date: 1918-10-08
Summary:

A Chinese employed in the Government Civil Hospital was charged on remand with being in unlawful possession of a dagger. It is stated that the client was carrying the dagger for self protection as he was surrounded by men belonging to the Ko Sing [sic] theatre.

19
Newspaper Source: South China Morning Post
Publication Date: 1919-07-18
Summary:

The youth who was charged with the unlawful possession of three $100 notes again appeared. The defendant stated he was employed at the Ko Shing Theatre.

20
Newspaper Source: South China Morning Post
Publication Date: 1919-07-24
Summary:

An old man, who was attending a performance at the Tai Ping Theatre on Tuesday, took off his mandarin jacket and put it on the next seat which was empty. When about to leave he put out his hand for the jacket, but it was gone.