A History Of Film Exhibition And Reception In Colonial Hong Kong: 1897 To 1925
Displaying 1 - 20 of 58
1
Newspaper Source: Hong Kong Telegraph
Publication Date: 1915-06-21
Summary:

This morning at the Police Court, a Chinese, who was charged with the theft of a pair of slippers was said to have deprived the owner of them while he was asleep in the Taiping Theatre. He also relieved another of the audience of a silver button, and this morning when he appeared before Mr. Wood…

2
Newspaper Source: Hong Kong Telegraph
Publication Date: 1916-12-23
Summary:

Three Chinese were charged before Mr. J. R. Wood, at the Police Court his morning, with creating a disturbance at the Tai Ping Theatre. Inspector O' Sullivan said the three men were sitting in seats under the gallery, for which they had paid, and an employee went round to collect two cents…

3
Newspaper Source: Hong Kong Telegraph
Publication Date: 1918-04-12
Summary:

Seven men were charged before Mr. Dyer Ball, at the Police Court this morning, with behaving in a disorderly manner at the Kei You [sic] Fong Theatre. Only two of them appeared, the bail money of the others being estreated. It was stated by Sergeant Cockle that the men were from the North…

4
Newspaper Source: Hong Kong Telegraph
Publication Date: 1918-08-02
Summary:

A number of summons were heard by Mr. J. R. Wood, at the Police Court this morning, against the proprietors of the Victoria Theatre, the Hong Kong Cinema [sic], and the Empire Cinematograph Theatre. The summons against the Victoria Theatre was for failing to keep two buckets of water and a…

5
Newspaper Source: Hong Kong Telegraph
Publication Date: 1918-09-20
Summary:

Two coolies employed at the Government Civil Hospital were charged at the Police Court this morning, before Mr. J. R. Wood, with assaulting a ticket-collector of the Ko Shing Theatre. Inspector O'Sullivan said that at about 7 p.m., last night, the complainant, who was a ticket-collector in…

6
Newspaper Source: Hong Kong Telegraph
Publication Date: 1920-06-12
Summary:

There is a belief amongst the police that hawkers who sell tickets for the Wo Ping Theatre are in league with pickpockets. It is said that whilst the theatre-goers were engaged in buying the tickets, the thieves operated upon them, and with some degree of success as has been evidenced by…

7
Newspaper Source: Hong Kong Telegraph
Publication Date: 1923-01-03
Summary:

Before Mr. R. E. Lindsell, at the Police Court this morning, R. Leuterio, a Filipino, was charged by the Hongkong Amusements Company with having left their employ without giving proper notice. Defendant said his wife was ill and it was for this reason that he wanted to return to Manila. Mr. R. E…

8
Newspaper Source: Hong Kong Telegraph
Publication Date: 1923-01-31
Summary:

Proprietors of local cinemas this morning figured in the Police Court on several summonses for affixing bills and posters on Crown property. Mr. H. W. Ray of the Coronet Theatre was summoned on two courts – for posting bills on prohibited walls at Lower Albert Road and at the flight of steps…

9
Newspaper Source: Hong Kong Telegraph
Publication Date: 1924-07-30
Summary:

For allowing the gangway to be obstructed by spectators during a performance, the owner of the Kau U Fong Theatre was fined $50 by Mr. R.E. Lindsell, at the Police Court this morning.

10
Newspaper Source: South China Morning Post
Publication Date: 1905-03-04
Summary:

At the Police Court, Lai Keng, the lessee of the Ko-shing Theatre, Queen's Road West, was summoned on two charges: (1) On February 26, obstructing the gangways and exits of the theatre; and (2) permitting people to stand in the gangways. Li Ching, manager of the theatre, deposed that he…

11
Newspaper Source: South China Morning Post
Publication Date: 1905-05-02
Summary:

L. S. Robert Willa, (No. 63) placed Pang Kai before Mr. Haseland, at the Police Court on Monday, charged with assaulting him whilst in the execution of his duty at the Ko Shing Theatre on the 29th ultimo. Wills stated that defendant, while in the theatre, would not sit down, thereby obstructing…

12
Newspaper Source: South China Morning Post
Publication Date: 1905-05-24
Summary:

Chan Iu, a hawker, was charged at the Police Court yesterday morning with (1) hawking theatre ticket without a hawker's license, and (2) causing an obstruction at West Point on 22nd inst., by hawking tickets on the footpath. Chan Iu was fined $5 on the first charge, and $20 on the second.…

13
Newspaper Source: South China Morning Post
Publication Date: 1905-09-30
Summary:

Lo Chiu was fined $5 for selling theatre tickets near the Chung Hing Theatre.

14
Headline: Illegal Hawking
Newspaper Source: South China Morning Post
Publication Date: 1905-10-04
Summary:

Cheng Kwai Hung, a hawker of vegetables, for which he has a licence, found hawking theatre tickets more profitable than his own avocation. He went to Po Yan Street to carry on his new line of business. Unfortunately before he had been there very long, he was spotted by Chinese lukong No. 390 in…

15
Newspaper Source: South China Morning Post
Publication Date: 1905-06-14
Summary:

The proprietor of the Ko Shing Theatre, Queen's Road West, summoned at the instance of Inspector Gourlay for allowing people to have access to the stage while a piece was being played on the 7th instant. The case was remanded.

16
Newspaper Source: South China Morning Post
Publication Date: 1905-08-12
Summary:

A case related to Ko Shing Theatre: Luk Ki Kwong, a witness, said that Tang Fuk Cho was introduced to him as a partner of the Ko Shing Theatre, but later in the cross examination, Luk admitted to Mr. Pollock that the defendant did not admit that he himself was a partner.

17
Newspaper Source: South China Morning Post
Publication Date: 1905-08-14
Summary:

Lance-Sergeant Willis said he had been in the Ko Shing and Chung Hing theatres continuously to the end of May for over two years. He had seen complainant in the Ko Shing Theatre, and knew him by the nickname of 'Tai Po.'

18
Newspaper Source: South China Morning Post
Publication Date: 1905-08-31
Summary:

Lam Yau, a coolie, was discovered by an actor in the 'Ko Shing Theatre' under his bed with a bundle of clothing. He raised the alarm and the defendant ran into a closet where he was arrested. He stated that he went there to sleep as, being a newcomer, he was strange to the locality.…

19
Newspaper Source: South China Morning Post
Publication Date: 1905-09-02
Summary:

The Ko Shing Theatre got into trouble again, and were summoned by P. S. Fenton for blocking the gangways of the theatre. Mr. Looker appeared for the defence, and a fine of $100 was imposed. Another summon against the theatre charged a nominal fine of $1.

20
Newspaper Source: South China Morning Post
Publication Date: 1906-01-03
Summary:

An Indian watchman, Imam Din, was charged $7 for being disorderly at the Tai Ping Theatre. This person tried to get onto the stage and refused to leave when told.